• Be gentle, patient, and kind to yourself and others.
  • Yoga is therapeutic in many ways, but it is not psychotherapy or physical therapy.  Seek guidance from a professional in those fields if you need the support that they can offer to your health and well-being.
  • If you have an injury, practice in a nurturing way, even if that means coming into the room, sitting and breathing. Getting on the mat daily is the most important component of practice.
  • It's not an all or nothing process, and it is not linear.
  • Do not add on, skip poses, or take poses out of the sequence unless you've discussed with the teacher.   
  • Treat each day as a new day. honor your life rhythms, your surroundings, and practice acceptance.
  • After back-bending, move to the finishing area or back of room to complete inversions and finishing poses. When resting, face your feet away from the altar.
  • Be sure to take rest for at least 5-10 minutes at the end of practice. It is essential to digest and allow the mind/body organism to assimilate before continuing with your day.\
  • You are the authority of your body. Let the teacher know if you do not want adjustments or any particular adjustment. If something doesn’t feel right, let them know. If want them to stop, tell them.  The learning process is a relationship, you are responsible for at least half of it.
  • Be respectful and receptive when considering other’s differences.
  • Listen to and follow instructions given by the teacher. if you have injuries or special needs, tell the teacher.
  • Sign in, legibly.  Every time you come in.  Yes, you.
  • Pay class dues on time. Practice generosity when sliding-scale or donation based classes are offered.
  • Keep yourself and your belongings (yoga mat, towel, yoga clothing) clean and fragrance free.
  • Always shower before practice, wear clean clothes and use a clean mat towel.
  • Be as quiet and efficient as possible when entering the room and preparing for practice.